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Cooperstown Chiropractic Turns 25

Cooperstown Chiropractic is Turning 25!

25 years ago, Cooperstown Chiropractic went from Dr. Cooper’s goal, to a reality. To kick off our silver anniversary we are asking for your help. During the month of July we would like to share stories or quotes of why you, our amazing patients love chiropractic and how it has transformed your life.

To help us do this, we ask that you e-mail us your story/quote to admin@cooperstownchiro.com or send a private message on the Cooperstown Chiropractic Facebook page.

Thank you for allowing us to serve you for 25 amazing years!

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© Revelation Health, LLC

Dinner with the Doctor, Revamp!

Dinner with the Doctor Revamp

This month we are revamping our Dinner with the Doctor! We have a new opportunity for detoxifying your body, not just on a organ specific level, but on a cellular level.If you struggle with any of the symptoms listed above, bring a friend and find out how True Cellular Detox may help you.

We will be testing that night for True Cellular Detox, utilizing a different method that tests your optical nerve. Why the optical nerve? It’s the easiest way to know how neurotoxins are affecting the brain. Curious to see how it works? Well join us!
Wednesday, June 22nd, 6:30 p.m. at
Florentine’s Grill at the Tuscany Club
102 N Harbor Dr. in Downtown Fullerton.Please R.S.V.P. no later than 12 p.m. on Tuesday, June 21st with your meal preference. The menu selection is listed below:

FLORENTINE’S GRILL
DINNER WITH THE DOCTOR MENU

Downtown Salad
Mixed greens/ Cranberries/ Gorgonzola Crumbles/ Caramelized Pecans/ Lemon Vinaigrette
Choose One: Chicken/ Salmon/ Shrimp

Chicken Pesto
Penne Noodles/ Sun Dried Tomatoes/ Mushrooms/ Pine Nuts
*ask for gluten free or wheat pasta

Vegetable Lasagna
Eggplant/ Zucchini/ Yellow Squash/ Mushrooms/ Bell Peppers/ Ricotta/ Pesto/ Béchamel

Cedar Plank Baked Atlantic Salmon
Mango Relish/ Rice Pilaf/ Grilled Vegetable Skewer

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Dictionary Series - Philosophy: philosophy

Your Health Philosophy

In December we had shared an opportunity for you to join us to ask yourself the tough questions and find out if you truly know and understand about where you turn for your health. Do you know what your health philosophy is?

Dr. Patrick Gentempo walks you through 5 modules to help you not only understand why philosophy is important in your life, but most importantly why having a strong health philosophy is most important in your life.

You will be asked to introspectively think and answer questions like:

  1. Do you know what you believe?
  2. Do you know why you believe it?
  3. Where do you go for guidance of your health?
  4. Are you turning to blogs or websites that go against what you believe?

Each module takes about 30 minutes, so what are you waiting for? Maybe you forgot the link? It’s ok, we can help with that.

http://www.healthphilosophy.com/doc/KenCooper

This $67 program is our gift to you. We look forward to sharing your health journey with you.

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Safe Sunscreen

We are lucky to be based out here in beautiful southern California. Our weather is typically mild, and Hollywood portrays us as the perfect place to live. With all of the amazing outdoor opportunities we have, we want to share with you safe sunscreen. Most people tend to forget their skin is their biggest organ of the human body. Here is the Environmental Watchdog Group’s (EWG) 8 Little Known Facts of Sunscreen.

https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen#.V1IZRfUjbpg.link

(article is posted below)

 

Sunscreen should be just one tool in your arsenal. These eight little known facts about sunscreens will help you spot problem products and avoid getting burned.

1. There’s no proof that sunscreens prevent most skin cancer.

Rates of melanoma – the most deadly form of skin cancer – have tripled over the past 35 years. Most scientists and public health agencies – including the FDA itself – have found very little evidence that sunscreen prevents most types of skin cancer. Read more.

2. Don’t be fooled by high SPF.

High-SPF products tempt people to apply too little sunscreen and stay in the sun too long. The FDA has proposed prohibiting the sale of sunscreens with SPF values greater than 50+, calling higher SPF values “inherently misleading,” but it has not issued a regulation that carries the force of law. More than 10 percent of sunscreens we evaluated this year advertise SPF values greater than 50+. Read more.

3. The common sunscreen additive vitamin A may speed development of skin cancer.

The sunscreen industry adds a form of vitamin A to 16 percent of beach and sport sunscreens, 14 percent of moisturizers with SPF and 10 percent of lip products in this year’s database.

Retinyl palmitate is an antioxidant that combats skin aging. But studies by federal government scientists indicate that it may trigger development of skin tumors and lesions when used on skin in the presence of sunlight. Other governments warn that cosmetics may contribute to unsafe amounts of vitamin A, and recommend against using vitamin-A-laden cosmetics on the lips and over large portions of the body. EWG recommends that consumers avoid sunscreens, lip products and skin lotions that contain vitamin A, also called retinyl palmitate, retinyl acetate, retinyl linoleate and retinol. Read More

4. European sunscreens provide better UVA protection.

In Europe, sunscreen makers can formulate their products with any of seven chemicals that filter UVA rays. American manufacturers can use only three UVA-filtering ingredients. They have been waiting for years for FDA approval to use sunscreen ingredients widely available in Europe. The FDA has asked the makers of European sunscreen chemicals for more safety data, but until the FDA approves these ingredients and lifts restrictions on combining certain active ingredients, American consumers will be hard-pressed to find sunscreens with the strongest UVA protection. Read more.

5. Sunscreen doesn’t protect skin from all types of sun damage.

SPF measure protection from sunburn but not other types of skin damage The sun’s ultraviolet rays also generate free radicals that damage DNA and skin cells, accelerate skin aging and may cause skin cancer. American sunscreens can reduce these damages, but not as effectively as they prevent sunburn. People can run into problems if they pick a sunscreen with poor UVA protection, apply too little or reapply it infrequently. Sunscreen companies commonly add SPF boosters that inhibit sunburn but may not protect from other damages. The FDA should strengthen its regulations to ensure that sunscreens offer the best possible skin protection. Read more.

6. Some sunscreen ingredients disrupt hormones and cause skin allergies.

There is no perfect sunscreen. Americans must choose between “chemical” sunscreens, which have inferior stability, penetrate the skin and may disrupt the body’s hormone system, and “mineral” sunscreens, made with zinc and titanium, often “micronized” or made up of nanoparticles. Some sunscreens also contain inactive sunscreen ingredients that may trigger allergies. FDA should consider new evidence about the ill effects of sunscreen ingredients. Read more.

7. Mineral sunscreens contain nano-particles.

Most zinc oxide and titanium dioxide-based sunscreens contain nanoparticles one-twentieth the width of a human hair, to reduce or eliminate the chalky white tint that larger particles leave on the skin. Based on the available information, EWG gives a favorable rating to mineral sunscreens, but the FDA should restrict the use of unstable or UV-reactive forms of minerals that would lessen skin protection. Read more.

8. If you avoid sun, check your vitamin D levels.

Sunshine causes the body to produce vitamin D, a critical function that sunscreen appears to inhibit. Vitamin D, technically a hormone, strengthens bones and the immune system and reduces risks of breast, colon, kidney and ovarian cancers and perhaps other disorders.

About 25 percent of Americans have borderline low levels of vitamin D, and 8 percent have a serious deficiency. Breast-fed infants, people with darker skin and people who have limited sun exposure are at greatest risk for vitamin D deficiency. Many people can’t or shouldn’t rely on the sun for vitamin D. Check with your doctor to find out whether you should get a vitamin D test or take seasonal or year-round supplements. Read more

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